Wednesday, May 1, 2013

Final Project

For my final presentation I used Glogster.  Please Check out the following link and let me know what you think!!


http://aqavzik.edu.glogster.com/graphing-with-colors

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Assignment 3


Final project reflection

Graphing with Colors

            For my final project of the semester my group and I decided to choose standards in the area of Mathematics.  Although I do teach 3rd grade, I also decided to incorporate 2nd grade standards (as well as 3rd) into my lesson.  Since my class is at a lower level in mathematics, I believed that these goals would better meet the goals of my class as a whole.  For this lesson students focused on gathering data and representing it in a tally chart, as well as a bar and pictograph.  Once students were finished with these products, they were asked a series of questions based on their information. 
            Overall I believe this project went well.  I chose to follow the Explicit Instruction model.  While following this model, I first game a teacher demonstration (I do), then guided practice (We do) and finally Independent practice (You do).  Before I presented this lesson to my students, I felt it was important and necessary to first gage where they were at in terms of understanding graphs.  To help with this, I had them complete a Pre Test.  The results of the pretests indicated that students had a much easier time identifying pictographs and tally charts.  The result also showed that near half of the class had a harder time identifying a bar graph, X&Y axis’ as well as answering word problems pertaining to a graph.  With this data I was able to better direct my Teacher Model to help teach and solidify missing gaps of knowledge.
            During my Teacher Model I involved students in my data collection.  The topic for my model was ‘favorite Yupik food’. With this I had students vote on their favorite food (out of a total of 5 different foods).  I chose to have students vote with their eyes closed, as I assumed I would get a better accurate measurement.  I did this, since I know and have experienced in the past that if students see other students voting a certain way, they end up voting the same.  This worked out perfectly as we had at least 1 person vote for each category.  Once I created the tally chart on the board I modeled how to create a bar graph as well as a pictograph.  This went flawlessly.
            In my Guided Practice portion of the lesson I placed students in groups of 3.  I did this in order to make it easier to work in groups for this next section.  Before student entered the room I scattered colored tiles around the room.  Once they were in the classroom I gave them 30 seconds to gather as many tiles as possible.  Once 30 seconds were up-they were to go to their groups.  This part of the lesson was both fun and engaging and I would definitely consider using this activity again.  Once students were in groups they were instructed to create a tally chart combining all tiles from all members of the group.  Combing and creating was the easy part.  I however came across the problem of groups being done way quicker than other groups.  I’m not sure how to prevent this.  I did not want them to move on, since we were doing the project all together on the board.  Once groups gathered their data, we combined them on the board.  After which we create a bar graph and pictograph.
            After the Guided Practice portion of this lesson-it was time for the Independent practice.  I gave students the option to work in a partner group or to work alone.  For the lower students I gave them a partially filled out Tally chart, bar graph and pictograph.  For the medium leveled students I gave them charts and graphs that were less filled out and required them to come up with their own scaling system and category names.  For the higher-level students I gave them blank charts and graph papers for them to gather their own information on. By giving students the option to work in partner pairs I believe I helped adhere to their comfort level, and it was really great seeing how well they worked with each other.  Each person in the partner pair had their own Jellybeans; therefore they had their own set of numbers for their charts and graphs.  The benefit to having them work in a partner pair was that they could bounce ideas off one another. Once they were finished they had the option to present their data using a program called ‘Photobooth’ or Prezi. The medium level students worked independently on their slightly filled out charts and graphs and continue to use the jellybeans as their source of data.  A few high students completed their jellybean charts quickly, and moved onto their own data collection of a topic they had chosen.
            Overall I think this project was completed very smoothly. It was amazing how the student who finished early were so eager to create their own tally charts and graphs.  They enjoyed collecting data on the class, whether it was people’s favorite colors, favorite animal or favorite basketball team.  The partner pairs worked out great and everyone was able to finish their product in a timely manner.  At the conclusion of this project students were given a post test-it was amazing see their mannerisms change so much this time around (the first time the complained about not know the material being asked). Overall students did much better on all aspects of the test.  The post test did however still show me a portion of the standard in which I could focus a little more detail on next time (or in further lessons).  The question in which still ¼ of the students missed was the one regarding X and Y-axis’. Knowing this provides insight and information on what I could improve when presenting this lesson next time, and I look forward to even better results!

2 of my students completed their presentations on a program called Prezi.  A link to both presentations are below.  

High student:
http://prezi.com/jukl-szwni5w/nikolais-graphs/?kw=view-jukl-szwni5w&rc=ref-38243443
Medium student:
http://prezi.com/qoeo0sjxg1tp/chases-jelly-bean-project/?kw=view-qoeo0sjxg1tp&rc=ref-38243443

Students were  given an option to present their data on either a program called Prezi, or by recording themselves on photobook.  One of my lower level students chose to present their data on photobooth, here is the recording.  As you can see the charts are much more filled out than those of the previous examples.

Lower level student:
video
 



Here is the data collected from the pre and post tests:
These tests were given to 17 students, below represents the number of students who missed the question in each area.  First in the Pretest, followed by the results of the Post Test

Pretest
Identifying bar graphs: 5
Identifying pictographs: 3
Identifying X & Y-axis: 10
Word problem: 7
Identifying Tally chart: 2

Post Test
Identifying bar graphs:0
Identifying pictographs:1
Identifying X & Y-axis: 5
Word problem:1
Identifying Tally chart:1

**The lesson plan in which i followed for this lesson is included in the Blog 12 post  

Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Blog 12: How I will demonstrate impact on Student learning as a result of my lesson

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Essential Question: How will I demonstrate impact on student learning as a result of my differentiated lesson?

There are several ways in which I will demonstrate impact on student learning as a result of my differentiated lesson.  One of these ways includes the use of a KWL chart.  As a class we will create a chart on things we already know and want to know about graphing data.  At the conclusion of the lesson we again visit the chart and fill in what we’ve learned as a result of the lesson.
            Another way in which I will demonstrate an impact on student learning is by administering a pre and post assessment.  For these assessments I chose to use a traditional paper pencil format.  These assessments were designed to help define where each student is at in terms of the particular standards being tested.
            In addition to the KWL chart and the pre and post assessments, I will also be keeping anecdotal data.   The document being used is labeled ‘Checklist for Progress’.  Within this checklist are key questions to help identify where student may be struggling during each part of the lessons.  Some example questions include: Can the student identify a bar graph? Does the student know how to properly set up and record data on a tally chart?...etc.
            Once students have completed their required charts they will go through a process of presenting their information.  Students can choose form 1 of two options.  They may choose to use a program called Prezi, or use Photobooth.  Students will be required to create a presentation explaining the steps they took in creating their end pieces.

Unfortunately this week I have not communicated with my PLN as much as I had hoped.  In fact, it was probably the least I’ve participated since the beginning of the semester.  Although I did communicate on email with the people who are doing a similar project as I, it was not nearly as much as I should have.  In an effort to catch up however I have been dedicating the past few nights to reading other peoples blogs and taking a deeper look at what their upcoming project will be.  I look forward to seeing the finish products soon, and hearing how well everyone’s project worked out within the classroom.

Below I have included my lesson plan, pre and post assessment  and checklist.  I plan on teaching this lesson on either Thursday or Friday of this week.  Wish me luck!



Tuesday, April 9, 2013

Blog 11: Technology and Classrom Management


Essential Question: What technology will I use to allow students to demonstrate they have met the standards targeted by my rubric? What are the classroom management considerations that I must address?

Technology

Using the rubric that was created last week our group investigated several technology programs that could be used to demonstrate proficiency in each standard. As a result, we determined that the best way to differentiate student’s end product would be to provide several technology options to present knowledge gained. Each of my group members and I chose to investigate different technology options based on our own students needs and learning styles.  We chose our programs based on the how we can help accommodate for each students learning style, as well as allowing for creativity. 

            At the moment I am in the mists of investigating a few programs.  Although the base program is not entirely decided, I do know that I want to incorporate the use of cameras into the project.  Students will be required to document their progress with photos and upload them onto a computer.  With these photos students will have the option to either create a slide show, an movie (either using photobooth or imovie), a computer application such as animoto or prezi (I’m still in the mists of deciding which program might be more appropriate and ‘easily’ taught).

Classroom Management:

            In terms of management while using certain forms of technology there are several things that should be considered.   When incorporating technology in a student based project the classroom will be a little crazy and louder than usual.  Student will also not be doing the same thing at the same time either.  As a result, I must assure that a few things are in place before hand. 
            One of the first things that will need to be addressed is the process in which student need to know in order to develop their product.  They must also know what is expected of them and what they should do if they need help or finish early. Before expecting students to use a technology project it’s important to actually teach how to use the program before hand.  To do this it may be wise to actually do the activity using the different program options as a whole group before releasing them to choose their own program and pathway to completion.
            A great management tool that could be key to a successful technology integration classroom is to encourage other students to be technology mentor for other students (hence the reason why group discussions could play an important role).
            For this project I will most likely assign particular students as ‘helper’ students. I will also have set rules for computers posted on a wall that can be easily seen and pointed out to those students who may be off track (some rules can include items such as; respecting other peoples privacy, leaving the settings on the computer the way they are, treat the computer with respect, no drinks or food near the computers, move carefully when around computers. Also displayed will be ‘cheat’ tips for each program option available.  This may include items such as; how to save your work and where to store your project. 
            Aside for the above mentioned management strategies; I will conduct my classroom using the procedures that are already established within my classroom.

PLN Communication:

            I’ve communicated rather frequently with my PLN this week. Aside from the email and Skype conversations with my group members, I’ve also spent time speaking with a more seasoned teacher about the expectations of using computers.  I’ve also been fortunate enough to have a few teachers suggest presentation programs that they have used in the classroom with their students.  I look forward to investigating the programs more in depth as the week progresses and am excited to get this project off the ground!   

Tuesday, April 2, 2013

Blog 10


Hallie, Courtney I all collaborated for week 10.

Courtney and I teach 3rd grade and Hallie works with special needs students. We are all in the same district and have been through many trainings together. We are very familiar with each other’s students as well as the environment that we teach in.

We stared this assignment focusing on writing. After running into several issues with student expectations we decided to look at our math goals. That is where we found our starting point. The goal we started with is as follows;

Represent and interpret data.
2.MD.9. Collect, record, interpret, represent,
and describe data in a table, graph or line plot.
2.MD.10. Draw a picture graph and a bar
graph (with single-unit scale) to represent a
data set with up to four categories. Solve
simple put-together, take-apart and compare
problems using information presented in a bar graph

We looked at this and compared it to the third grade standard to try and teach students to the level they are at, as well as where they are suppose to be. That brought us to this standard for third grade:

3.MD.4. Draw a scaled picture graph and a
scaled bar graph to represent a data set with
several categories. Solve one- and two-step
“how many more” and “how many less”
problems using information presented in
scaled bar graphs. For example, draw a bar
graph in which each square in the bar graph might represent 5 pets.

For our project, we plan to have students collect data on a given topic. They will record the data they collected on a table. They will then analyze the data and create a graph (line, bar, picture, etc.) to display the data. After the students complete their graphs, they will answer “how many more” or “how many less” questions to compare their data. They will then work in groups to discuss the data, graphs, and questions they answered. 

Below is the rubric we created:
 
Level Collecting Data Graphs Word Problems Communication
Outstanding Student collected individual data on a topic of interest in order to create a graph. Student was able to correctly create a graph (i.e. bar, line or picture) using individual data collected on a topic of their choice, with all the necessary requirements including (correct scaling, title, labeled axis, etc. Student was able to create and solve simple put-together, take-apart or compare word problems using information from a graph. Student displayed maximum participation in small group and/or whole class discussions (i.e discussed the data and graph, answered questions, shared opinions, asked questions, helped others clarify confusion, instructed and helped other students on their assignments, etc.)
Satisfactory Student fully participated in the class data collecting process by participating in the class discussion and by creating a table with tallies to present data. Student was able to correctly create graphs (i.e. bar, line or picture) using the data collected as a class with all  necessary requirements including (correct scaling, title, labeled axis, etc.) Student was able to correctly answer simple put-together, take-apart or compare word problems that were associated with the completed graph. Student displayed good participation in small group and/or whole class discussions (i.e discussed the data and graph, answered questions, shared opinions, etc.)
Needs Improvement Student had limited participation in the data collecting process. Student was able to correctly create a graph or graphs (i.e. bar, line or picture) using the data collected as a class, however some requirements were missing. Student struggled to correctly answer simple put-together, take-apart or compare word problems using information from the completed graph. Student displayed minimal   participation in small group and/or whole class discussions

Saturday, March 23, 2013

Blog 9: How can I use Pearltrees to differentiate content in the classroom?

           
How can I use Pearltrees to differentiate content in the classroom?

       This week we were given the opportunity to learn a new program called 'Pearltrees'.  Although apprehensive when I first logged in, the worry dissipated as I began navigating around.  This program is simple and intuitive.  

      In my opinion the Pearltrees is a type of advanced bookmarking program that allows its users to save URLs, pictures and notes.  Instead of the traditional bookmarking system that uses folders or 'tags', this program chose a more appealing look.  A single Pearltrees is created around 1 main topic.  When websites, photos, and notes are gathered about that topic, pearls are added on (creating something similar to a branch).  The great thing about this program however, is that others can join in and contribute.  As a result of its physical appearance, simple navigation, and its ability to have users connect upon similar interests, Pearltrees can possibly a great tool to use within a classroom.  
    
      I believe using Pearltrees within the classroom has a possibility of being very beneficial in terms of differentiating.  I see this program as having multiple uses.  One of these uses is directed more towards the organization of information used within the classroom. This program can allow for teachers to organize all their online supplemental resources for given subjects in topics.  Let's say for instance, the topic and subject happened to be the States of Matter (Science).  A teacher could use this program as a means to organize additional videos, games, reading, photos and notes. Students who may be struggling in the concept, as well as those students who need enrichment, could use this site as a means to explore the topic deeper.  This program also has the capacity help teachers help students to reach all students on their intelligence level needs, from providing interactive games, music, videos, articles and photos.  Pearltrees could be an excellent program for a teacher to use within the classroom to help differentiate instruction.  

     Another use in which Pearltrees could be use to help differentiate content in the classroom would be to have students be involved with the program directly.  Although I do see this happening more in the older grades, it could also serve as a useful tool to use in a group setting in the younger grades. If a student is involved with the creation of their own Pearltree, it helps lend itself for a stronger connection with ones own learning.  A teacher could have students use this program as a means for organizing information on a specific topic, sharing it with individuals and digging deeper on given topics.  

     I definitely see myself using this program in the future, especially in terms of organizing supplemental resources on specific topics (especially science!).  I believe that this could really help aid in my quest to becoming a truly differentiated classroom.

Communication:

     This week has been an extremely productive week in terms of communicating with my PLN.  My partner and I have been in constant communication for the last week about Project 2 and we are now at the finishing touches (yay!).  I've also had the opportunity to share what I’ve learned about a program called a Glogster (noted in my last blog) with other staff members within my school. Although I did not actively communicate with Twitter (I did attend Thursday, but did not contribute much that conversation in particular), I did feel that it helped me better understand this week’s assignment.  I also spend some time this past week checking out other people’s blogs.  As a result I discovered some very interesting and useful games I might be able to use within my classroom. I look forward to seeing what next week has to offer.
    

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

Blog 8: How might video games enhance my students' learning?


How might video games enhance my students' learning?

A few months ago I noticed that often times on topics that were completely new to my students our lessons would take nearly an hour longer that was scheduled (often times I had to cut out science/social studies to accommodate for it).  It appeared that if my students were struggling with a new concept they often ‘checked out’ on me during explanations and examples.  As a result I began asking other teachers what they do in order to help keep students on task and engaged in the lesson.  After several conversations I learned that a lot of teachers offered rewards to the class if everyone finished during our class period (it’s an hour and 40 minutes).  Such rewards often included free time in the classroom or on the computer.  Well, although I do like to give free time once in a while, I felt that there had to be a way to incorporate some type of reward that not only served as a ‘change of pace’ activity, but one that would be fun yet still focused on the skill necessary for students to understand the concept being taught.

Although I did consider having students do math games (such as file folder games and the sort), I noticed that most of my students were more motivated by the idea of playing with a computer. Plus, who has the time to create whole games and gather its materials for every topic?  I certainly don’t. As a result I began my hunt for Internet programs/games that I could use within my classroom. A few programs in which I used within my classroom already this year for Mathematics in particular include: IXL Math, Sumdog and Timez Attack.  I used IXL for a while, but noticed that students got bored with it quickly; therefore I talked to another teacher who suggested Sumdog.  That too is really great website, but unfortunately it requires A LOT of bandwidth that my school does not seem to have (at least for 15 students to be on at one time), therefore I had to put that program on the side table.  The last one that I mentioned is one that I still use within the classroom.  I will investigate it further in the latter portion of my blog. 

The task this week turned out to be exactly what I needed.  With my current students I noticed early that they really loved computer video games (who doesn’t?).  I knew that although I did use a program called Timez Attack, it only focuses on just a few of the many standards that students need to master, therefore it became a necessity for me to find another video game type of program (or two) that was fun to do, but provided additional practice in the current skills being taught.  This assignment came just in time too, as I recently decided to stop using IXL Math as much and needed a new rewards program/educational game to incorporate into the later half of math. Before I talk about the two new programs that I just introduced to my 3rd graders, let me tell you first about a program called Timez Attack.  In order to respond to the questions associated with this task I decided to observe the reactions/engagement of my students while playing this game.

Program: Timez Attack                        
Website: http://www.bigbrainz.com/
Standards:
3.OA.4. Determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication or division equation relating three whole numbers.

3.OA.7. Fluently multiply and divide numbers up to 100, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., knowing that 8 ×5 = 40, one knows 40 ÷ 5 = 8) or properties of operations. By the end of Grade 3, know from memory all products of two one-digit numbers.


1.     Was the child engaged?
Students were very engaged.  In fact, students actually ask to play Timez Attack when they finish other work early.  They love it!

2.     Did the child learn the skills that were targeted? 
They are in the process of it yes. I can see improvement in multiplication and division fluency.

3.     Can the child demonstrate that these skills were mastered? 
Students can demonstrate that theses skills are mastered.  Currently I administer AIMS Web Probes biweekly to students and can visually see the improvement.

4.     Who in your PLN did you consult with about these games? How did they respond or assist?
I consulted with my coworkers about these games.  I learned that the current 5th grade teacher was the one that uploaded the game on about half of our school laptops.  He is the one that introduced it to me after I asked about what math programs I could use. 

Program: Fun Brain
Website: Games on 3rd grade level: http://www.funbrain.com/FBSearch.php?Grade=3
Website home page: http://www.funbrain.com/

Standards:
3.MD.1. Tell and write time to the nearest minute and measure time intervals in minutes. Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes or hours (e.g., by representing the problem on a number line diagram or clock).

3.OA.4. Determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication or division equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 x ? = 48, 5 = ?÷ 3, 6 x 6 = ?

3.OA.7. Fluently multiply and divide numbers up to 100, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., knowing that 8 ×5 = 40, one knows 40 ÷ 5 = 8) or properties of operations. By the end of Grade 3, know from memory all products of two one-digit numbers.

3.NBT.1. Use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100.

3.NBT.3. Multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 (e.g., 9 x 80, 10 x 60) using strategies based on place value and properties of operations.

3.MD.1. Tell and write time to the nearest minute and measure time intervals in minutes. Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes or hours (e.g., by representing the problem on a number line diagram or clock).

1.     Was the child engaged?
Students really loved this website actually.  One of my students were actually the one that introduced me to this program (I figured it wouldn’t hurt to ask students what websites they like to go to for Math, and this was one of them).
2.     Did the child learn the skills that were targeted? 
Students did learn the skills that were targeted. 
3.     Can the child demonstrate that these skills were mastered? 
Students are able to demonstrate that the skills learned were mastered by providing a short quiz afterwards.  By having students practice the skills in a game like matter they didn’t feel like they were ‘learning’ but rather just having fun!
4.     Who in your PLN did you consult with about these games? How did they respond or assist?
Amazingly enough no other teachers knew about this program.  After a student told me, however I let several other teachers no about it.  I plan on introducing it to the rest of the staff next Monday during our Staff Meeting.

Program: Mr. Nussbaum

Website: A few games particular to 3rd Grade: http://mrnussbaum.com/grade-3/
Main Website homepage:  http://mrnussbaum.com/

Standards:
3.OA.3 Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

3.OA.7 Fluently multiply and divide within 100, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., knowing that 8 × 5 = 40, one knows 40 ÷ 5 = 8) or properties of operations. By the end of Grade 3, know from memory all products of two one-digit numbers.

3.OA.8 Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including rounding.

3.NBT.1 Use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100.

3.NBT.2 Fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.

3.NF.3.b Recognize and generate simple equivalent fractions, (e.g., 1/2 = 2/4, 4/6 = 2/3). Explain why the fractions are equivalent, e.g., by using a visual fraction model.

3.MD.2 Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l). Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem.
1.     Was the child engaged?
This was another successful website that I introduced to my students.  They enjoyed the games on it, and it had several games that were applicable to Alaska State Standards.

2.     Did the child learn the skills that were targeted? 
They did, I discovered the success after give a short quiz afterwards.

3.     Can the child demonstrate that these skills were mastered? 
Students are able to demonstrate that these skills were mastered as they progressed through the game successfully, most showed mastery on the quiz following the use of the program.

4.     Who in your PLN did you consult with about these games? How did they respond or assist?
This was another website that the 5th grade teacher introduced to me.  I spoke with him about my desire to find a program more engaging that IXL,  yet still provided additional help in topics across the board.